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How to Import All Exports from a JavaScript Module

Learn how to easily import all exports from a JavaScript module using ES6 import syntax.

Last updated on October 5, 2023 at 10:30 AM

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Krste Rajchevski

Software Engineer @ Bugpilot

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Have you ever been in a situation where you needed to import all exports from a JavaScript module? Maybe you came across a third-party module that exports multiple functions or classes, and you didn't want to import them one by one. Well, you're in luck! In this guide, we'll explore how to import all exports from a JavaScript module using the ES6 import syntax. This technique will not only save you time but also make your code more concise and readable. Let's dive in!

Importing All Exports

In JavaScript, when a module exports multiple values, you can import them individually like this:

import { export1, export2, export3 } from 'module';

But what if you have many exports and you want to import all of them without listing each one explicitly? Fortunately, there is a simple and elegant solution. You can use the * symbol to import all exports from a module. Here's how it's done:

import * as module from 'module';

In the above code, module is an alias that represents all the exports from the module. You can then access the exported values using dot notation, like module.export1, module.export2, and so on. This approach is especially useful when working with large modules that export multiple functions or classes.

Using Imported Exports

Once you've imported all the exports from a module, you can start using them in your code. For example, let's say you have a module called mathUtils that exports various utility functions:

1export function add(a, b) {
2  return a + b;
3}
4
5export function subtract(a, b) {
6  return a - b;
7}
8
9export function multiply(a, b) {
10  return a * b;
11}
12

To import all of these functions, you can use the * syntax as follows:

1import * as math from "mathUtils";
2
3console.log(math.add(3, 5)); // Output: 8
4console.log(math.subtract(10, 4)); // Output: 6
5console.log(math.multiply(2, 6)); // Output: 12
6

As you can see, by using the * syntax, you're able to access each exported function through the math alias. This allows you to use the functions as if they were defined locally in your own module.

Importing a Default Export

If a module also has a default export in addition to named exports, you can import all exports including the default one using the * syntax. Here's an example:

1// module.js
2const greeting = "Hello,";
3
4export function sayHello(name) {
5  console.log(`${greeting}
6 ${name}
7!`);
8}
9
10export default function helloWorld() {
11  console.log("Hello, world!");
12}
13

To import both the named exports and the default export, you can do the following:

1import * as module from "module";
2
3module.sayHello("John"); // Output: Hello, John!
4module.default(); // Output: Hello, world!
5

In this case, the default function can be accessed using module.default. Remember to use the appropriate syntax when importing both named and default exports.

Conclusion

Importing all exports from a JavaScript module is a powerful technique that can streamline your code and improve readability. With the ES6 import syntax, you can easily import multiple exports without having to list them individually. Remember to use the * symbol and an alias to represent all the exports from the module. This approach is especially useful when working with large modules that have multiple functions or classes.
In this guide, we've explored how to import all exports from a JavaScript module and how to use them in your code. Now you can import multiple exports without the need for repetitive import statements. So go ahead and simplify your code by leveraging this powerful feature of the ES6 import syntax!

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